Archive for the 'Revision Rhinoplasty' Category

The Profiles Perspective: Our Belief that Synthetic (Alloplastic) Materials Should Not Be Used in Rhinoplasty

At Profiles, we have always held the standard and belief that when doing rhinoplasty and revision rhinoplasty, there is a hierarchy we can follow when grafting material is needed. Ideally, whenever possible, we use septal cartilage. It allows us to replace any missing cartilage or to build support using tissue that is essentially identical to the normal cartilage we find in your nose. In some cases, the septal cartilage is too thin and flimsy and unsuitable for use; even in primary cases. And in revision rhinoplasty, the quantity and quality of remaining septal cartilage may be inadequate for reconstruction.

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Rib Cartilage in Rhinoplasty Surgery: The Beverly Hills Profiles Perspective

If you are reading this post, you likely had previous rhinoplasty and have now seen a revision surgeon who has recommended that you have rib cartilage removed during your revision surgery. The use of rib cartilage in revision rhinoplasty has become increasingly popular over the last many years as revision rhinoplasty surgeons continue to seek out alternative sources of cartilage for grafts that are often necessary during revision.

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Steroids and Rhinoplasty

Please note: We are happy to see that our blog is of some help to many of you who are considering or recovering from rhinoplasty. While we would like to address your concerns directly, we are not able to dispense medical advice over the internet. Your own surgeon is your best resource in the first weeks and months after surgery. If, after 5-6 months, you continue to feel unhappy with your result, feel free to contact us via our practice site www.beverlyhillsprofiles.com and we can arrange time to discuss your concerns. All the best for a happy outcome.

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What do you do if too much nostril shows?

March 30th, 2010 | Category: Revision Rhinoplasty,Uncategorized

The Hanging Columella or Notched Ala: Why you see so much of your columella and septum on profile and how we fix it
The Appearance of Retracted Nostrils or of  Too Much Visible Septum

If you are looking at this blog, you (or someone you hold dear) probably had a rhinoplasty (nose job) sometime in the past and now when you see yourself, especially on profile, all you see is that the middle part of your nose at the bottom (the columella and the septum behind it) is way too visible. Perhaps you have been thinking all this time that your septum shows way too much or that the middle part just seems to hang so low.  You may have seen your original surgeon who said you “healed badly” or you just figured it can’t really be fixed. And unfortunately, frequently this is a problem that even many surgeons find confusing.

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Ethmoid bone grafts in Rhinoplasty and Revision Rhinoplasty

Recently we’ve seen a number of people who have asked about the use of ethmoid bone in revision rhinoplasty. Each had previously undergone a nose job that had over time either resulted in loss of tip support- resulting in a droopy nasal tip- or had a twisted nose which had been partially corrected but over time had twisted again- resulting in a crooked nasal tip. Read more

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Rhinoplasty and Nostril Narrowing at the same time

We have recently heard from a couple of prospective patients who are concerned about having open rhinoplasty to narrow the tip and a nostril narrowing procedure (alar base reduction) at the same time. They had been to see other surgeons who had advised against this because of fear of risk to the blood supply of the nasal tip. Read more

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Loss of identity after rhinoplasty

June 04th, 2009 | Category: Revision Rhinoplasty,Rhinoplasty Philosophy

Everyone who has suffered a poor Rhinoplasty result experiences a range of negative emotions. All are understandably unhappy about their noses and fearful of misplacing their trust once more. Yet, there are some who experience a more extreme reaction, a few of whom we’ve seen recently. Read more

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Does a radix graft make your eyes look closer together?

An interesting question that came up on the RealSelf forum had to do with radix grafts. A radix graft is a (usually) small piece of cartilage placed at the root of your nose between your eyes. It’s meant to add height to this area and is potentially used for several reasons. Read more

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Nasal Implants: Is an I-shaped implant better than an L-shaped implant?

How about neither? We are often asked about nasal implants. These are primarily used for East Asians, African Americans, and others seeking a stronger, higher nasal bridge and a more refined tip. They are also sometimes recommended for patients whose bridge has been lowered too much during previous surgery. Implants can be of various materials but the most commonly used implants are made of silicone/silastic.

nasal implant
nasal implant

Above you can see the typical shape of a nasal L-strut implant. This particular one happens to made of Medpor which can be a real problem to revise…but that’s another story.

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Lost in Translation: Overseas Surgery

March 09th, 2009 | Category: Ethnic Rhinoplasty,Revision Rhinoplasty

Every so often we are confronted by the patient who has gone overseas to have surgery only to return with a botched result. Now this is not to say that surgeons outside the US are not good or as accomplished but simply that once you have surgery overseas your ability to have adeuate follow up or in the worst case scenario recourse toward revision are dramatically decreased. Read more

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