Dec 2

The ‘concertina effect’: what do traffic jams and eyelid surgery have in common?

Why do many people who have eyelid procedures often look like a deer caught in the headlights? Are their surgeons just pulling their lids a little too tight or is it something more? Recent studies have shed some light on this issue and shown us that the whole concept of eyelid aging has been wrong and is in need of an overhaul.

eyelid lift

For a long time, it has been thought that as we age, the support structures that ‘hold in’ the eye weaken allowing for fat from around the eye to protrude and cause baggy pockets. As a result, the “correction” for heavy and tired eyelids for decades has been to remove this so-called ‘extra’ fat.

Unfortunately the results of this approach are eyelids that look smoother for a time but eventually, due to removal of the fat, the eyes can often come to look aged and hollowed. In actual fact, studies show that the fat and bone beneath the eye and over the cheek shrink over time. So, the cheek flattens and the lower eyelid loses its foundation and ‘folds down’ like an accordion. This accordion-like folding is known as the “concertina effect”, the same kind of rippling we see in a caterpillar’s movement or in traffic clogs long after the blockage has cleared.

The answer is not to remove or reposition the fat from inside the eye to make a flatter eyelid to fit a flatter cheek. That’s not youthful at all. A youthful look is all about convexity when it comes to cheeks and eyelids. We don’t remove fat from the eye at all. Instead, we restore a truly vibrant convexity by replacing the fat volume where it is needed, in the hollows beneath the eyes. By combining this with trimming of the stretchy skin over the eyelid, we have seen a real change from very good results with older techniques to remarkable results with our new Profiles Eye Lift. We welcome you to see the evolution of eyelid procedures for yourself. You won’t believe your eyes.

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